>Red World: Moldova: Democratically elected Communist Party ruled between 2001 and 2009

>Pictured here: Former president of Moldova (2001-2009) Vladimir Voronin transformed the Moldavian section of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union into the Party of Communists of the Republic of Moldova.

Republic of Moldova
Constituent republic of USSR:
October 12, 1924-August 27, 1991
Previous names:
1) Soviet Socialist Republic of Moldova: June 1990-May 23, 1991
2) Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic: August 2, 1940-June 1990
3) Moldavian Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic within Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic: October, 12 1924-August 2, 1940
4) Moldavian Autonomous Oblast within Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic: March 7-October 12, 1924
Type of state:
“Post”-communist “multiparty” state under covert control of restored/continuing CPSU
Neo-communist renewal:
“Collapse of communism,” 1991
Neo-communist re-renewal:
Democratically elected neo-communist government, 2001
Communist government:
1) Party of Communists of the Republic of Moldova (“ex”-CPSU leader), in coalition with Democratic Party of Moldova, Social Liberal Party, and Christian Democratic People’s Party (“ex”-communist): 2005-present
2) Party of Communists of the Republic of Moldova (“ex”-CPSU leader): 2001-2005
3) Democratic Convention of Moldova (consisting of Party of Revival and Accord, Christian Democratic People’s Front (“ex”-communist), and other pro-Lucinschi parties), Bloc for a Democratic and Prosperous Moldova (pro-Lucinschi), and Party of Democratic Forces: 1998-2001
4) Agrarian Democratic Party of Moldova (“ex”-CPSU leader, Petru Lucinschi): 1996-1998
5) Agrarian Democratic Party of Moldova (“ex”-CPSU leader, Petru Lucinschi) and Socialist Union (consisting of Unity Movement and Socialist Party of Moldova (“ex”-communist)): 1994-1996
6) Christian Democratic People’s Front (formerly People’s Front of Moldova): 1992-1994
7) People’s Front of Moldova (formerly Communist Party of Moldavia): 1991-1992
8) Communist Party of Moldavia (Moldavian section of CPSU), sole legal party: 1940-1991
9) Bessarabian Soviet Socialist Republic, proclaimed by Bolsheviks from provisional capital in Tiraspol, but never recognized: 1919
Communist Bloc memberships: Commonwealth of Independent States, GUAM Organization for Democracy and Economic Development, Community of Democratic Choice
Socialist International presence: Social Democratic Party of Moldova (observer)
Ethnic Russian composition: 5.9%
Presidents of “post”-communist Moldova:
1) Mihai Ghimpu (Liberal Party, co-founded communist-dominated People’s Front of Moldova): September 11, 2009-present (acting)
2) Vladimir Voronin (“ex”-CPSU, Party of Communists of the Republic of Moldova): April 7, 2001-September 11, 2009
3) Petru Lucinschi (“ex”-CPSU, Agrarian Democratic Party of Moldova, Democratic Convention of Moldova): January 15, 1997-April 7, 2001
4) Mircea Snegur (CPSU, Agrarian Democratic Party of Moldova, Party of Revival and Accord, Democratic Convention of Moldova; Chairman, Supreme Soviet, Moldavian SSR, 1989-1990): September 3, 1990-January 15, 1997
Prime ministers of “post”-communist Moldova:
1) Vlad Filat (Liberal Democratic Party of Moldova, Democratic Party of Moldova): September 25, 2009-present
2) Vitalie Pirlog (Party of Communists of the Republic of Moldova): September 14-25, 2009 (acting)
3) Zinaida Greceanîi (Party of Communists of the Republic of Moldova, born in Russia): March 20, 2008-September 14, 2009
4) Vasile Tarlev (Party of Communists of the Republic of Moldova): April 19, 2001-March 20, 2008
5) Dumitru Braghiş (“ex”-CPSU, Social Democracy Party of Moldova): December 21, 1999-April 19, 2001
6) Valeriu Bobutac: November 12-December 21, 1999
7) Ion Sturza: February 19-November 9, 1999
8) Serafim Urechean (“ex”-CPSU, Party Alliance Our Moldova): February 5-17, 1999
9) Ion Ciubuc: January 24, 1997-February 1, 1999
10) Andrei Sangheli (“ex”-CPSU, Agrarian Democratic Party of Moldova): July 1, 1992-January 24, 1997
11) Valeriu Moravschi (Socialist Workers’ Party, National Peasant Party Christian Democratic): May 28, 1991-July 1, 1992
12) Mircea Druc (“ex”-communist People’s Front of Moldavia): May 26, 1990-May 28, 1991
Parliament of “post”-communist Moldova: Unicameral 101-seat Parliament of the Republic of Moldova Soviet-era “parliament”: Supreme Soviet (Council), provisional parliament until 1994
Communist parties of “post”-communist Moldova:
1) Electoral Bloc “Homeland/Motherland”: This electoral bloc was founded in 2004 by the Socialist Party of Moldova and the Party of Communists of the Republic of Moldova.
2) Organizing Committee on Restoration in Moldova of a Communist Party of Leninist Type: This party was founded as a split from the Party of Communists of the Republic of Moldova and operates under the leadership of Igor Kucher.
3) Party of Communists of the Republic of Moldova (PCRM): The PCRM was organized in October 1993 from the remnants of the Communist Party of Moldavia, which was “banned” in August 1991. It registered in April 1994. On September 27, 2003 the Party of Civic Dignity of Moldova joined the PCRM. The PCRM currently operates under the leadership of Vladimir Voronin and associates with the UCP-CPSU and the ICS. The party has openly ruled Moldova since 2001, when it won the parliamentary and presidential elections of that year.
4) Revolutionary Workers’ Party: This is a Trotskyist party.
5) Union of Communists of Moldova (UCM): The UCM was founded in 1997 as a split from the Party of Communists of the Republic of Moldova.
Crypto-communist parties of “post”-communist Moldova:
1) Agrarian Democratic Party of Moldova: This party consists of “ex”-communists and rural leftists who support closer economic and political ties with Russia as opposed to Romania. Mircea Snegur (“ex”-CPSU) was the first leader of the ADPM, followed by Petru Lucinschi (“ex”-CPSU).
2) Bloc for a Democratic and Prosperous Moldova: Founded in December 1996 under the leadership of Deputy Speaker of Parliament Dumitru Diacov, this electoral bloc supported President Petru Lucinschi (“ex”-CPSU) in the 1998 parliamentary election.
3) Labor Union “Homeland”: This party was founded in 1999 and operates under the leadership of Gheorghe Sima.
4) Moldova Noastra (“Our Moldova”) Alliance (MNA): Founded on July 19, 2003, the MNA combines the Social-Democratic Alliance of Moldova, Liberal Party, Independents’ Alliance of Moldova, and Democratic Peoples’ Party of Moldova. The alliance chair is Serafim Urechean.
5) Party of Revival and Accord: This party was founded by Mircea Snegur (“ex”-CPSU) who, under the communist regime of the Moldavian SSR, was Chair of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Moldavia, as well as Chair of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet.
6) Party of Socialists of the Republic of Moldova (PSRM): The PSRM is a left-socialist party that was founded in 1997 as split from the Socialist Party of Moldova and operates under the leadership of Veronica Abramciuc.
7) People’s Front of Moldova: Founded on May 20, 1989 as the Democratic Movement of Moldova, this potemkin, pan-Romanian party enjoyed a high degree of support from “reformists” in the Communist Party of Moldavia (CPM) in the early days of Moldovan “independence.” On February 11, 1990, the People’s Front, with the official support of government authorities, organized a “Republic’s Voters Meeting” in the capital Chisinau. This was attended by more than 100,000 people and was addressed by Petru Lucinschi, First Secretary of the CPM, and other high-level communist officials. The People’s Front insisted that the country be renamed the Romanian Republic of Moldova, its citizens be called “Romanians,” and Romanian be designated as the country’s official language. Among the communist candidates supported by the People’s Front during the 1990 Supreme Soviet election, one could find the names of high-ranking CPM members such as Mircea Snegur. On August 27, 1991, after the “hardline” communist coup in Moscow, the CPM “banned” itself, all of the communist deputies joined the People’s Front, which became the official government, and Moldovan “independence” was proclaimed.The People’s Front was renamed in 1992 as the Christian Democratic People’s Front and is currently known as the Christian Democratic People’s Party. Iurie Roşca is the long-time leader of the People’s Front. Prior to the March 6, 2005 parliamentary election Roşca publicly stated: “Moldova today is a tiny red stain in an ocean of orange.” Notwithstanding this comment, on April 8, after the communists formed a second government, upon the recommendation of parliamentary speaker Marian Lupu (PCRM) and with the support of the governing communists, Roşca was elected to the position of vice-speaker.
8) Social Democracy Alliance of Moldova (ASDM): The ASDM emerged from the People’s Front of Moldova after 1990. Originally known as the Social Democracy Party of Moldova (PDS), the ASDM adopted the name Social-Political Movement “Civic Alliance for Reforms” in 1997, and then its current name in 1999. It operates under the leadership of Dumitru Braghis (“ex”-CPSU), and holds observers status in both the Socialist International and the Eastern European Social Democratic Forum. Since 2003 it has been part of the Moldova Noastra Alliance. The ASDM should be distinguished from the Social-Democratic Party of Moldova, which was founded on May 13, 1990 and operates under the leadership of Eduard Musuc.
9) Socialist Action Party: This party was founded in 1997 as a split from the Socialist Party of Moldova. It operates under the leadership of Aurel Cepoi and has supported the presidential campaigns of Petru Lucinshi (“ex”-CPSU).
10) Socialist Party of Moldova (SPM): Founded on August 11, 1992 by “ex”-members of the old Communist Party of Moldavia, the SPM joined the Unitate-Edintsvo (“Unity”) Movement the following year with the intention of running in the 1994 parliamentary election. The SPM also field candidates in the 1995, 1999, and 2003 local elections. The party operates under the leadership of Victor Morev.
Russian military presence: In accordance with its 1992 agreement with Moldova, which followed the War of Transnistria, Russia has a right to maintain up to 2,400 troops in Transnistria, which the Moldovan government considers part of its territory. As of 2006, however, under the terms of the Joint Control Commission, Moldova supplies 403 troops to the ceasefire maintenance force, Transnistria 411, and Russia 385.

One response to “>Red World: Moldova: Democratically elected Communist Party ruled between 2001 and 2009

  1. mah29001 December 12, 2006 at 4:28 pm

    >Not a surprise there either. Many of these fellows in power in “former” Soviet states like Moldova were in power when Communism “fell”. This is quite true among Moldova’s Central Asian “former” Soviet bloc counterparts.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: